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Enhanced External Counterpulsation: A Non-invasive Treatment for Heart Disease

EECP has been clinically proven to be as effective as bypass surgery, angioplasty and stents for treating coronary artery disease, angina and congestive heart failure

Monday, March 19, 2007

If you or someone you love suffer from symptoms of heart disease, such a shortness of breath, lack of energy, chest pain or pain in the jaw, neck, arms and back, then you should know about a noninvasive solution that is covered by insurance (including Medicare) and that could dramatically improve the quality of your life.

Enhanced External Counterpulsation (EECP) has been clinically proven to be as effective as bypass surgery, angioplasty and stents. Offered by leading medical centers including the Mayo Clinic, it is FDA-approved as a treatment for coronary artery disease, angina and congestive heart failure.

During EECP, you lie on your back for an hour with a series of blood pressure cuffs wrapped around your legs. An EKG triggers the cuffs to inflate and deflate in sync with your own heart beat, pumping healthy blood throughout your body and taking the load off your heart. During this process, healthy, oxygenated blood opens or forms small, collateral blood vessels that can actually create a natural bypass around narrowed or blocked arteries.

The typical treatment period is one hour a day, five days a week for seven weeks. This may seem like quite an ordeal but it beats the heck out of surgery, and the benefits usually last for about five years.

To learn more about this amazing therapy, check out the Web site www.bravermancenters. com. Dr. Debra Braverman, M.D., is one of the pioneers in this exciting area. She has also written a book, entitled “Heal Your Heart with
EECP,” which is available in most bookstores or online at Amazon.com.


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